Volunteer Positions Explained

Interested in volunteering but not sure which position is right for you?  You’ve come to the right place.

Below you will find our many volunteer positions explained. Read on, and let us know if you have any questions about the jobs below.

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Please visit our Sign Up Genius account to view available jobs, dates, and sign up now!

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If you have questions or would rather talk to a person, please call us at (802) 457-1509 and we will make sure you’re directed to the right person.

Check out USEA’s great source for Eventing volunteers– videos that go over many positions.

Contact Karey Waters – Karey@gmhainc.org – (802) 457-1509, ext. 203 with questions or to sign up now!

Fence Judge

Here’s an idea of what to expect (courtesy of British Eventing)- things are pretty similar here in the USA:

The instructions that follow give you the basics of your job; a briefing will be planned for you, conducted by the officials of the event that will help fill in and supplement this document.

YOUR JOB AS A JUMP JUDGE

To maintain a safe area:

  • Keep a completely clear approach and landing to your jump for the competition; use your voice or whistle if needed. This includes evaluating the footing at the jump and notifying control ii repair is needed.
  • Sit in front of and to the side of the jump to clearly see the horses as they approach be out of the way but don’t hide. An official will check your positioning.
  • If a horse is having difficulty al your jump, an oncoming rider has the right of way. Please inform the rider to clear the approach as the oncoming horse and rider have the right of
  • Reporting any instances of unauthorized assistance or cruelly.
  • Promptly notify control in the case of a fall or accident. (Take your radio with you when you go to the rider).

To judge riders jumping your fence, you will:

  • Observe each competitor at the jump, determine if any faults occur and record the appropriate penalties on your scoresheet.
  • Know the wording and intent of the rules.
  • Know that your jump is defined by a red flag on the right and a white flag on the left side.
  • Know the difference in judging an obstacle with a single number. I.e. 17 vs. one of multiple elements or parts, i.e., 17ABC.
  • Do not discuss anything about the competition with competitors; if they have questions, politely refer them to one of the officials.

KEY WORDS TO REMEMBER WHEN YOU JUDGE

  • DECISIVE. Remember to be decisive- as absolute as possible. As a judge, YOU are the best person to clearly observe all of the details that happen as horse and rider attempt to jump your obstacle. For instance, riders are too busy planning, reacting and steering to fully realize if their horse has taken one or several steps backward or steps sideways. Use the same decision making standard for each rider.
  • WRITE or DRAW. When in doubt of how to score, WRITE/DRAW a complete description of what you observed, then IMMEDIATELY request either the Technical Delegate or Ground Jury official to assist you in the interpretation.
  • FAIR AND CONSISTENT. Your job is not to agree or disagree with each rule but to enforce the rules as they are written in a fair and consistent manner for every competitor.

BEFORE YOU LEAVE THE BRIEFING TO GO OUT ON COURSE

Know your jump number and the proper color for the level of competition – Beginner Novice: black I on yellow background, or as designated by the organizer and printed on the course map; Novice: black# on white background; Training: while ii on black background; Modified: orange# on blue background; Preliminary: white # on green background; Intermediate: white # on red background; Advanced: white # on blue background

Know the location of the nearest radio; if you are a radio communicator, you will be instructed how to use your radio to report on the course; keep chatter brief; specific instructions will be reviewed in the briefing. Do NOT put the radio down in assisting with a situation; immediately report three things – the status of the horse, the rider and the jump! Please notify control ii medical either for human or horse is required.

Ring Steward

Here’s an idea of what to expect (courtesy of British Eventing)- things are pretty similar here in the USA:

The job of the ring steward is to make sure competitors are ready to go into the ring on time, and to be the “eyes and ears” of the competition‐ ensuring that the competition runs on time, that there is a level playing field for all competitors and that horses are treated fairly and humanely.

You will be stationed at your ring with a show schedule. Greet and keep track of all competitors in your area, and let them know if you are running on time, ahead, or behind. Also tell them where they are in the order of go‐ next, 2 away, etc. For dressage, let the competitors know where they can warm‐up, around or inside the ring when it is their turn, and which signal (bell, whistle, etc.) will be used for their ring. You may have to direct traffic! Keep competitors and or spectators away from the judge’s booth and keep the ring entrance and/or exit clear.

If you are missing a competitor who is 2 or 3 away, first radio the warm‐up steward. If the competitor is not there,  radio the show office to see if they have scratched. Pass along any information you have to the judge‐ in between rides. Sometimes judges turn radios off – don’t panic. Wait for them to call you or walk over to them between rides. If there are scratches, other competitors MAY go earlier, but are not required to ride before their time.

It is ultimately the competitor’s responsibility to get to the ring on time!

Don’t try to radio the judge during a ride! Wait until the competitor has finished and salutes to pass along any messages.

JOB REQUIREMENTS

No prior experience is needed. Patience and tact are needed, you’ll be dealing mainly with competitors and their horses. Some competitors are old hands and know exactly where to go and what to do and others are brand new. Even the best can experience an attack of nerves. Your calm good humor will help many a competitor to have a successful day!

Organization and ability to multi‐task are a definite plus!

WHAT TO EXPECT

You will be provided with a booth to keep you out of the sun and rain‐ but you will have to leave the booth to talk to competitors. On the positive side, you get to watch all the tests, and you’ll get to see all the horses up close.

Warm-Up Steward

The job of the Warm-up Steward is to ensure that all competitors have a safe area to use for warm-up, and to send competitors to the show ring at the appropriate time.

WHAT TO EXPECT

You will be stationed at your ring with a show schedule. Greet and keep track of all competitors in your area, and let them know if you are running on time, ahead, or behind.

Keep your eyes open for any potential safety problems-report any out of control horses, questionable equipment, or bad behavior to the Technical Delegate or show management. You are the eyes and ears, but you don’t have to be the enforcer!

You may have to direct traffic!  Keep the ring entrance and/or exit clear.

Alert competitors when they are “3 away” and “2 away”. When they are “on deck”, or next in the ring, ask them to go to the competition ring. You will have radio contact with the steward at  ringside- listen to the radio to keep track of the schedule, and call your steward with any questions.

If a competitor does not appear in warm-up 15-20 minutes prior to their scheduled time, contact the show office to see if they have scratched. Radio the ring steward and let them know who has scratched, who is on the way and who just didn’t show up.

It is ultimately the competitor’s responsibility to get to the ring on time.

JOB REQUIREMENTS

No prior experience is needed. Patience and tact are needed; you’ll be dealing mainly with competitors and their horses. Some competitors are old hands and know exactly where to go and what to do and others are brand new. Even the best can experience an attack of nerves. Your calm good humor will help many a competitor to have a successful day!

Organization and ability to multi‐task are a definite plus!

Dressage Scribe

The job of the scribe is to be a record keeper for the judge’s score sheet in dressage (or anywhere else, such as presentation or cones).

WHAT TO EXPECT

You must make sure the judges have the proper tests for each ride, ensure that the test is marked with the correct competitor’s number, and write down the judge’s comments exactly as given. When you pick up your clipboard, take a moment to look through the tests to be sure they are correct and match the schedule.

Before starting, find out how the judge likes to dictate the comments. Some will give comments first, and then the score…some the other way around.

As competitors enter the ring, make sure the horses bridle number matches the test sheet.

Make sure all the correct blanks are filled in, score and comment- if given- for every movement, and at the end of the ride make sure that the judge has signed the score sheet.

A runner will approach the judges booth between rides. Keep scoresheets organized and be prepared to hand them to the runner so that they can be delivered to the office for scoring.

You will learn a lot from the scores and comments – both about the judge (what they look for, pet peeves, etc) and on how to ride a test. However, this is a job where the old adages “to be seen and not heard” and “speak only when spoken to“ apply. Think before you speak, do not distract the judge with endless chatter and gossip and needless to say, what happens in the booth stays in the booth. Please don’t discuss competitors, their scores or the judge’s comments with other competitors or spectators.

As a scribe, you have a wonderful learning opportunity. Listen to the comments and learn what the judges look for. The tips you have just learned from an experienced judge will help to improve your driving. Scribing is an important job — your record keeping will be responsible for the final scores and placing of the competitors. The comments you write down will help competitors improve their driving too. Try not to get distracted by watching the competitor and forget to record the information! Although this is an important job, you can also have fun and learn a lot!

JOB REQUIREMENTS 

You MUST have prior experience.

You must be able to write fast and legibly – at the same time!

You should be organized and able to multitask – judges do not always give scores and comments in order, so you must keep up with the judge and make sure no movements are skipped. (Although not required, the ability to read minds does help.)

Some judges have quite a few comments, and you will need write legibly and keep up! Remember, these remarks are for the benefit of the rider and will determine their scores for the day and placings in the competition.

Show Jumping Scribe

The Cones Scribe records competitor’s scores, penalties and time and works with the judge and under his direction.

Record entries “at the judges command” in other words, even though you have counted rails down or have been monitoring the timer, wait for the judge to tell you what to write. The recorded score is ultimately the responsibility of the judge.

  1. At the Judge’s command, record rails down in the correct scoresheet box.
  2. At the Judge’s command, record time taken.
  3. At the Judge’s command – record course penalties, time penalties and total score as given by the Judge.
  4. At the end of the class, ask the Judge to sign the scoresheet.

REQUIREMENTS

No experience is necessary but you MUST be able to write quickly and neatly and multitask efficiently. The ability to remain calm and organized is a must!

Show Jumping Timer

  • The timer is responsible for accurately monitoring the start, finish and overall time it takes the competitor to complete the show jumping course.
  • You will be using an electronic timer and/or stopwatches – don’t worry, a staff member will set up the equipment and teach you how to use it.
  • Be sure the electric timer and/or your stopwatch is cleared and set when a competitor enters the ring.
  • The competitor may enter the ring after all cone setters have left the ring. He must salute and has one minute to pass the start gate after the judge blows his whistle.
  • Start your watch/timer when the horse’s nose crosses the finish line.
  • If the Judge sounds the whistle/bell while the competitor is on course: Stop your watch and the electronic timer (if it has that function) when you hear the signal
  • If the signal was for “Off Course” the Competitor is eliminated and will leave the ring.
  • Record the Competitor # and put “E” for the time on your backup sheet.
  • If the signal was for an equipment repair or an obstacle rebuild, start your watch/electronic timer when the Judge tells you to restart.
  • Stop your watch/timer when the horse’s nose crosses the finish.
  • Report your time, the full Minutes, Seconds, 1/100 Seconds to the Judge or scribe.
  • Record the Competitor #, Brief Description and Time Taken on the Cones Timer Backup Sheet.

REQUIREMENTS

No experience is necessary but you MUST be able to write quickly and neatly, multitask efficiently and stay calm!

Runner & Hospitality

The runner transports completed scoresheets to the office and snacks and lunches out to the field.

WHAT TO EXPECT

  • Collect the score sheets from each location described by show staff and bring them to the scorekeepers in the main office. Complete assigned route as rapidly and quietly as possible until the last scoresheet is collected.
  • Do not interrupt the judge during a test or while the competitor is in the ring. Wait quietly until the judge has a break between competitors to collect the score sheets.
  • Assure that score sheets are completely filled out before leaving the location: all scores and times included plus the judge’s signature.
  • Guard scoresheets with your life. Lost score sheets are a pretty big disaster!
  • Carry drinks and snacks for judges and volunteers as needed (there may or may not be a separate hospitality person, you may be filling in or this may be one of your primary duties)
  • Efficiently delivering scoresheets to the score keeper will ensure that scores are posted quickly. Not a small job!

REQUIREMENTS

  • No experience is required however a familiarity with the grounds is helpful.
  • You must be able to operate an ATV and/or golf cart
  • You’re the smiling face that volunteers and officials see throughout the day. Good humor is a must!

Start & Finish Timers

Here’s an idea of what to expect (from British Eventing)- things are not so different here in the USA:

 

Start – Start riders on their cross country rides, and announce them on radio. Maintain the flow of riders from warm-up to start box. Maintain a safe time interval between riders on course. Keep radio contact with Control to be aware of incidents or holds on course, and control rider flow appropriately. Experience preferred. Help our riders out of the start box in an efficient and relaxed way!

Timing Recorder – Accurately record start and finish times for each rider, as dictated by start/finish timer(s).

Timer – Accurately measure each rider’s time on course. Record time or dictate to scribe. As multiple riders are on course at the same time, multitasking and attention to detail are necessary.

Finish Timer – Accurately measure each rider’s finish time. Record time or dictate to scribe. As multiple riders are on course at the same time, multitasking and attention to detail are necessary.

Jump Crew

Keep the show jumping rings moving along quickly! Our jump crew will speedily replace rails and other jump materials that are knocked down or out of place. You’ll also help us raise and lower the jumps between levels.

JOB REQUIREMENTS

No experience required! You need to be fairly quick and able to lift 50 lbs (most of the rails and jump materials are much lighter than that, but you may have to move the occasional standard).

WHAT TO EXPECT

You’ll be out at the show jumping ring with a chair and possibly a booth, but dress for the elements. You’ll get to see all of the jumping action!

Contact Karey Waters – Karey@gmhainc.org – (802) 457-1509, ext. 203 with questions or to sign up now!

 

Dressage Ring Steward


JOB DESCRIPTION:

  • The job of the ring steward is to make sure competitors are ready to go into the ring on time, and to be the “eyes and ears” of the competition‐ ensuring that there is a level playing field for all competitors and the fair and humane treatment of horses.
  • You will be stationed at your ring with a show schedule. Greet and keep track of all riders in your area, and let them know if you are running on time, ahead, or behind. Also tell them where they are in the order of go‐ next, 2 away, ect. Let the riders know if they can warm‐up around or inside the ring when it is their turn, and which signal (bell, whistle, etc.) will be used for their ring.
  • If you are missing a rider who is 2 or 3 away, first contact the warm‐up steward. If the rider is not there, contact the show office to see if they have scratched. Pass along any information you
    have to the judge‐ in between rides. If there are scratches, other riders MAY go earlier, but are not required to ride before their time.
  • It is ultimately the rider’s responsibility to get themselves to the ring on time!
  • Don’t try to radio the judge during a ride! Wait until the rider salutes to pass along any messages. Be sure to ask the judge before allowing riders to show out of order. Let the judge
    know the number of riders who are filling scratches‐ they may not be correct on the scribe’s paperwork.
  • If your ring is running ahead or behind, let the show office know! They can make announcements to keep competitors informed.
  • Be aware of any behavior that could be considered cruelty or unsafe. Notify the TD immediately if you notice any suspect behavior. One of the most common issues is competitors lunging horses in show warm‐up areas. If you are not comfortable asking them to move to the designated lunging area, call the TD or show manager.

EMERGENCIES

If there is an emergency, don’t assume that someone else will call it in! You will be provided with a list of radio contacts‐ be alert and ready to radio for medical or veterinary help if
needed.

  • An EMT and veterinarian are both on the grounds at all times during competition.
  • If a rider falls, walk over to check on them WITH YOUR RADIO, but do not move them. DO NOT FORGET YOUR RADIO‐ it is your job to keep show management informed of the situation. Show management and the TD will get to your location ASAP to assist you.
  • Be sure to radio in any loose horses so that announcements can be made.

EQUIPMENT CHECK

Extra Credit Equipment Check Info

Depending on the ring you are assigned, you may be asked to perform random inspections (at the direction of the Technical Delegate) once the competitor has completed a ride. 1/3 of the horses in each class must be checked. Horses are to be checked ONLY AFTER THEY HAVE COMPETED! Your job is to notify the TD of any potential issues, for example whip is too long, or the bit is illegal, or questionable.

  • At the volunteer briefing, you will receive a clipboard with information and diagrams regarding what bits are illegal for your reference. The TD will instruct you on how frequently to inspect
    bits. You are not expected to memorize the reference materials‐ only to identify “red flags” and notify the TD for closer inspection.
  • You will also receive rubber gloves to use when checking bits‐ it is important to use new gloves for each horse! The TD will instruct you on how to properly check the bit.
  • Be sure to check the bit ONLY AFTER the horse’s performance, not before.
  • On your booth, there will be a mark designating acceptable length of whips. Inspect whip length at the direction of the TD. If a rider asks you to check their whip before their ride, go ahead.
  • Be on the look‐out for other illegal equipment or signs of cruelty (blood, illegal spurs or spur marks, etc), as indicated in your literature or described by the Technical Delegate.
  • Radio the TD immediately if you have any problems, questions, or illegal equipment.

JOB REQUIREMENTS

No prior experience is needed. If your position requires checking equipment, you should be confident around horses and comfortable putting your finger into a horse’s mouth. Patience and tact are needed; you’ll be dealing mainly with competitors and their horses. Organization and ability to multi‐task are a definite plus!

WHAT TO EXPECT

You will be provided with a booth to keep you out of the sun and rain‐ but you will have to leave the booth to talk to riders. On the positive side, you get to watch all the tests, and if checking equipment, will get to see the horses up close and personal.

Dressage Scribe


JOB DESCRIPTION
The job of the scribe is to make sure the judges have the proper tests for each ride, ensure that the test is marked with the correct competitor’s number, and write down the judge’s comments exactly as given. When you pick up your clipboard, take a moment to look through the tests to be sure they are correct and match the schedule.

Your job is to take notes and make sure all the correct blanks are filed in (score and comment- if given- for every movement, judge’s signature). Be sure to check the horses bridle number with the test sheet.

JOB REQUIREMENTS
For upper level classes, you MUST have prior experience. You must be able to write fast and legibly – at the same time! You should be organized and able to multitask – judges do not always give scores and comments in order, so you must keep up with the judge and make sure no movements are skipped. (Although not required, the ability to read minds does help.)

WHAT TO EXPECT
You’ll be seated in a booth with the judge- out of the rain and sun. You will pick up a clipboard and a box of supplies (pens, pencils, ect.) from the volunteer coordinator. There will be a chair and a desk in the booth for your use.

You will learn a lot from the scores and comments – both about the judge (what they look for, pet peeves, etc) and on how to ride a test. However, this is a job where the old adages “to be seen and not heard” and “speak only when spoken to“ apply.

As a scribe, you have a wonderful learning opportunity. Listen to the comments and learn what the judges look for. This will help you become a better rider, and concentrate on the tips you have just learned from an experienced judge. Scribing is an important job — your recordkeeping will be responsible for the final scores and placing of the competitors. The comments you write down will help competitors improve their riding. Try not to get distracted about watching the competitor and forget to record the information! Although this is an important job, you can also have fun and learn a lot!

Extra credit: Read the USDF Guide for Scribes!

Contact Carole Hunter –  Helgapinkie@gmail.com  –   (774) 563-0713 with questions or to sign up now!

 

Ring Steward

The job of the ring steward is to make sure competitors are ready to go into the ring on time, and to be the “eyes and ears” of the competition‐ ensuring that the competition runs on time, that there is a level playing field for all competitors and that horses are treated fairly and humanely.

  • You will be stationed at your ring with a show schedule. Greet and keep track of all competitors in your area, and let them know if you are running on time, ahead, or behind. Also tell them where they are in the order of go‐ next, 2 away, etc. Let the competitors know where they can warm‐up, around or inside the ring when it is their turn, and which signal (bell, whistle, etc.) will be used for their ring. You may have to direct traffic! Keep competitors and or spectators away from the judge’s booth and keep the ring entrance and/or exit clear.
  • If you are missing a competitor who is 2 or 3 away, first radio the warm‐up steward. If the competitor is not there, radio the show office to see if they have scratched. Pass along any information you have to the judge‐ in between rides. Sometimes judges turn radios off – don’t panic. Wait for them to call you or walk over to them between rides. If there are scratches, other competitors MAY go earlier, but are not required to ride before their time.
  • If a competitor is late the judge may choose to allow them to compete at a later time – or not. It is ultimately the competitor’s responsibility to get to the ring on time!
  • Don’t try to radio the judge during a ride! Wait until the competitor has finished and salutes to pass along any messages. Be sure to ask the judge before allowing competitors to show out of order. Let the judge know the number of competitors who are filling scratches‐ they may not be correct on the scribe’s paperwork.
  • If your ring is running ahead or behind, let the show office know! They can make announcements to keep competitors informed.
  • Helmets are required for driving competitors aged 18 or younger. Remind young competitor of the helmet rule or radio technical delegate for assistance. Adult competitors are not required to wear helmets in the dressage or cones phase of a driving competition

JOB REQUIREMENTS
No prior experience is needed. Patience and tact are needed, you’ll be dealing mainly with competitors and their horses. Some competitors are old hands and know exactly where to go and what to do and others are brand new. Even the best can experience an attack of nerves. Your calm good humor will help many a competitor to have a successful day!
Organization and ability to multi‐task are a definite plus!

WHAT TO EXPECT
You will be provided with a booth to keep you out of the sun and rain‐ but you will have to leave the booth to talk to competitors. On the positive side, you get to watch all the tests, and you’ll get to see all the horses, carriages and beautiful turnouts up close.

Warm-Up Steward


The job of the Warm-up Steward is to ensure that all competitors have a safe area to use for warm-up, and to send competitors to the show ring at the appropriate time.

WHAT TO EXPECT

  • You will be stationed at your ring with a show schedule. Greet and keep track of all competitors in your area, and let them know if you are running on time, ahead, or behind.
  • Keep your eyes open for any potential safety problems-report any out of control horses, questionable equipment, or bad behavior to the Technical Delegate or show management. You are the eyes and ears, but you don’t have to be the enforcer!
  • You may have to direct traffic! Keep the ring entrance and/or exit clear.
  • Alert competitors when they are “3 away” and “2 away”. When they are “on deck”, or next in the ring, ask them to go to the competition ring. You will have radio contact with the steward at ringside- listen to the radio to keep track of the schedule, and call your steward with any questions.
  • If a competitor does not appear in warm-up 15-20 minutes prior to their scheduled time, contact the show office to see if they have scratched. Radio the ring steward and let them know who has scratched, who is on the way and who just didn’t show up.
  • It is ultimately the competitor’s responsibility to get to the ring on time.

JOB REQUIREMENTS
No prior experience is needed. Patience and tact are needed; you’ll be dealing mainly with competitors and their horses.Some competitors are old hands and know exactly where to go and what to do and others are brand new. Even the best can experience an attack of nerves. Your calm good humor will help many a competitor to have a successful day!
Organization and ability to multi‐task are a definite plus!

Dressage Scribe

The job of the scribe is to be a record keeper for the judge’s score sheet in dressage.

WHAT TO EXPECT

  • You must make sure the judges have the proper tests for each ride, ensure that the test is marked with the correct competitor’s number, and write down the judge’s comments exactly as given. When you pick up your clipboard, take a moment to look through the tests to be sure they are correct and match the schedule.
  • Before starting, find out how the judge likes to dictate the comments. Some will give comments first, and then the score…some the other way around.
  • As competitors enter the ring, make sure the horses bridle number matches the test sheet. Write the judges position (C, B or E) on the score sheet
  • Make sure all the correct blanks are filled in, score and comment- if given- for every movement, and at the end of the ride make sure that the judge has signed the score sheet.
  • A runner will approach the judges booth between rides. Keep scoresheets organized and be prepared to hand them to the runner so that they can be delivered to the office for scoring.

You will learn a lot from the scores and comments – both about the judge (what they look for, pet peeves, etc) and on how to drive a test. However, this is a job where the old adages “to be seen and not heard” and “speak only when spoken to“ apply. Think before you speak, do not distract the judge with endless chatter and gossip and needless to say, what happens in the booth stays in the booth. Please don’t discuss competitors, their scores or the judge’s comments with other competitors or spectators.

As a scribe, you have a wonderful learning opportunity. Listen to the comments and learn what the judges look for. The tips you have just learned from an experienced judge will help to improve your driving. Scribing is an important job — your record keeping will be responsible for the final scores and placing of the competitors. The comments you write down will help competitors improve their driving too. Try not to get distracted by watching the competitor and forget to record the information! Although this is an important job, you can also have fun and learn a lot!

JOB REQUIREMENTS AND PREPARING TO SCRIBE
You MUST have prior experience. You must be able to write fast and legibly – at the same time! You should be organized and able to multitask – judges do not always give scores and comments in order, so you must keep up with the judge and make sure no movements are skipped. (Although not required, the ability to read minds does help.)

Some judges have quite a few comments, and you will need write legibly and also keep up! Remember, these remarks are for the benefit of the driver and will determine their scores for the day and placings in the competition.

Cones Scribe


The Cones Scribe records competitor’s scores, penalties and time and works with the judge and under his direction. The Cones Scribe may also be required to radio scores to the scorekeeper in the office and may also act as the timer.

Record entries “at the judges command” in other words, even though you have counted balls down or have been monitoring the timer, wait for the judge to tell you what to write. The recorded score is ultimately the responsibility of the judge.

1. At the Judge’s command, record ball down in the correct scoresheet box.
2. At the Judge’s command, record time taken.
3. At the Judge’s command – record course penalties, time penalties and total score as given by the Judge.
4. At the end of the class, ask the Judge to sign the scoresheet.

REQUIREMENTS
No experience is necessary but you MUST be able to write quickly and neatly and multitask efficiently. The ability to remain calm and organized is a must!

Cones Timer


The Cones Timer is responsible for accurately monitoring the start, finish and overall time it takes the competitor to run the course.

  • You will be using an electronic time and/or stopwatches – don;t worry, a staff member will set up the equipment and teach you how to use it.
  • Be sure the electric timer and/or your stopwatch is cleared and set when a competitor enters the ring.
  • The competitor may enter the ring after all cone setters have left the ring. He must salute and has one minute to pass the start gate after the judge blows his whistle.
  • Start your watch/timer when the horse’s nose crosses the finish line (first horse if a pair or four).
  • If the Judge sounds the whistle/bell while the competitor is on course:Stop your watch and the electronic timer (if it has that function) when you hear the signal
  • If the signal was for “Off Course” the Competitor is eliminated and will leave the ring. Record the Competitor # and put “E” for the time on your backup sheet.
  • If the signal was for an equipment repair or an obstacle rebuild, start your watch/electronic timer when the Judge tells you to
  • Stop your watch/timer when the horse’s nose crosses the finish line (first horse if a pair or four).
  • Report your time, the full Minutes, Seconds, 1/100 Seconds to the Judge.
  • Record the Competitor #, Brief Description and Time Taken on the Cones Timer Backup Sheet.

REQUIREMENTS
No experience is necessary but you MUST be able to write quickly and neatly, multitask efficiently and stay calm!

Cones Setters


Pairs of cones are set to allow the track width of the carriage plus a fixed distance (e.g. 35 cm for training level). Because carriages are different widths they must be measured and the appropriate track width determined. Don’t worry – you won’t have to do the math! Your job is to set the cones the correct distance apart for each competitor. Accuracy is important because this is where the winner may be decided and often the scores are just one knockdown apart. Work as quickly as possible so there are no unnecessary delays.

WHAT TO EXPECT

  • Once out on the course, you will be assigned a “zone” of the cones pairs (aka obstacles). You will be responsible for resetting the cones in your “zone”
  • You will hear the total measurement over the radio or PA from the Wheel Measurement station. Once you hear the new measurement, set your measuring stick to that width.
  • When you have your measurement and the course is clear, approach your assigned cones. Each set of cones will be “marked”, meaning that the edge of the right hand cone is spray painted on the ground. This cone will remain stationary throughout the competition.
  • Using your measuring stick, you will measure from the right cone (stationary, marked cone), adjusting the left cone to the current measurement being sure not to change the angle of the cones pair.
  • Replace all balls on your cones. Double check before you leave the ring.
  • No one but the driver is allowed on course while the clock is running. Always wait until the driver has finished the course before setting cones in your zone. After your cones are adjusted and all balls are up, check the numbers and other course markers to be sure they are still in place (they tend to blow over).
  • During the event, be as quiet as possible so as not to distract the drivers and equines. Be sure to pay close attention to each measurement and obstacle- many a protest has been filed for a mis-measured obstacle, ball not replaced, or obstacle not reset. You have the best seat in the house- enjoy watching each driver’s course!

REQUIREMENTS
No experience is necessary but you must be able to move quickly! Cones must be set quickly and accurately. Your precision may be the difference between winning and losing and your quickness will keep the show running on time and prevent unnecessary delays.

You cannot do this job if you have difficulty walking, moving quickly or bending.

Wheel Measuring


Pairs of cones are set to allow the track width of the carriage plus a fixed distance (e.g. 35 cm for training level). Because carriages are different widths they must be measured and the appropriate track width determined. Your job will be to measure, record and relay the track width for each competitor.

WHAT TO EXPECT

  • Measure Track Width of each Competitor
  • Place cones (flat side in) against widest part of the wheels with the carriage at a full halt. (measure the BACK wheels for a 4-wheeled carriage – it does not matter if the front wheels are wider.)
  • Ask the competitor to drive forward and be sure they do not “nudge” the cones in the process – if they do, have them halt again and redo the previous step.
  • Use the measuring stick provided, determine the wheel measurement in centimeters.
  • Record Competitor Number and Track Width on the Blank Wheel Measurement Form.
  • Determine the total measurement for the competitor by adding the clearance for their level to the wheel measurement.
  • Record this on the Wheel Measurement form. Don’t worry, there’s a handy chart to help you and you will be given a calculator if needed!
  • If wheels are being measured right before cones, radio the measurement of the next competitor to the cones steward while the previous driver is on-course.

REQUIREMENTS
No experience is necessary. Calmness and patience will help the most fidgety horse and most nervous driver to complete this step with ease. You will be required to write neatly, speak clearly over the radio and keep numbers straight!

Runner & Hospitality

The runner transports completed scoresheets to the office and snacks and lunches out to the field.

WHAT TO EXPECT

  • Collect the score sheets from each location described by show staff and bring them to the scorekeepers in the main office. Complete assigned route as rapidly and quietly as possible until the last scoresheet is collected.
  • Do not interrupt the judge during a test or while the competitor is in the ring. Wait quietly until the judge has a break between competitors to collect the score sheets.
  • Assure that score sheets are completely filled out before leaving the location: all scores and times included plus the judge’s signature.
  • Guard scoresheets with your life. Lost score sheets are a pretty big disaster!
  • Carry drinks and snacks for judges and volunteers as needed (there may or may not be a separate hospitality person, you may be filling in or this may be one of your primary duties)
  • Relay messages from judges and volunteers (Do not let this delay you, send the Hospitality Runner if it’s more than handing them a drink!).
  • Efficiently delivering scoresheets to the score keeper will ensure that scores are posted quickly. Not a small job!

REQUIREMENTS
No experience is required however a familiarity with the grounds is helpful. You must be able to operate an ATV and/or golf cart. You’re the smiling face that volunteers and officials see throughout the day. Good humor is a must!

Marathon Obstacle Observers

Thank you for volunteering to be an Obstacle Observer or Timer. Your work is important because the times and driving patterns you record will determine the competitor’s score on the marathon. Do plan to be on time for the briefing so your responsibilities can be explained under the supervision of the Technical Delegate or Head Obstacle Judge.

Please be aware that the competition is not over when the last Obstacle is driven. Competitors often have scoring issues that must be resolved with your help. Because you were the eyes on the ground you must wait to leave until all appeals have been resolved. We know it’s a long day but don;t worry we’ll feed you ice cream!

THE OBJECT OF THE MARATHON OBSTACLES is to drive through the prescribed “gates” (colored sets of lettered markers) in the fastest time. Gates must be driven in order – A, B, C etc. – and when going through a gate the first time, the red marker must always be on the right.
Please remember your main objective is to observe and record correctly. Throughout the day, remain consistent – do the same for all competitors. Discuss between team members, what was observed and in the case of contentious points please make sure all are prepared to report what they saw. It may be advisable to call for the T.D. or a member of the ground jury if you have concerns. You do not need to worry about levying or calculating penalties. Simply report accurately what you observe.

  • The competitor is under your control from the moment the nose of the leading horse crosses the plane of the entry gate, until the entire turnout crosses the plane of the exit gate.
  • Obstacle Observers should not write down a competitor’s number until they see and confirm that the competitor has entered the obstacle. Please do not pre-number your obstacle sheets based on the order of go you have been given. Things may change.
  • Please give all the Obstacle Observer Reports to the score collector, but retain your Back-Up Sheet. At the end of the day, you will return all of your equipment, including the back-up sheet, to the show office.
  • To drive the obstacle correctly the competitor must pass through each pair of lettered gates in the correct sequence and direction. The whole turnout must pass between the red and white markers. A competitor who drives part way into the gate, stops and reverses out has not officially passed through that gate.
  • If a gate is driven out of sequence, the competitor may correct the mistake. Simply write down exactly what you see the competitor do. Thus: A, B, D, E, F is a wrong course (missed C); A, B, D, C, D, E, F is a corrected course (after missing C at first, drove C correctly and then continued in sequence to finish the obstacle correctly).
  • Record on the Obstacle Observer Report the sequence of gates driven INCLUDING gates driven in reverse. On your report sheet, simply write down the gates as they are driven, including the gates driven in reverse. Please put brackets or parentheses around the letters for gates driven in reverse. DO NOT draw the track on the diagram.
  • Once a gate has been negotiated correctly it is considered “free” or “dead” and may be driven again in either direction.
    Once the entire turnout has passed out through the “out” gate, the competitor is deemed to have left the obstacle, but grooms may re-enter the obstacle on foot without incurring penalties, provided it is safe to do so.
  • Should a competitor remain within the obstacle for more than 5 minutes, the obstacle observer MUST blow his whistle twice. The competitor must leave the obstacle immediately, with help if necessary, and may not continue any further on the course as he has been eliminated.
  • The only person to handle the reins, whip or brake is the driver. Any assistance given in this respect by the grooms must be recorded. Failure to comply even to prevent an accident incurs a penalty. But grooms may handle the reins if the vehicle is stationary. Grooms may give assistance to a driver to prevent him from falling off the vehicle.
  • A competitor must stop immediately whenever a horse has its leg over a pole, lead bar or trace, and must rectify the problem. If the driver does not stop on his own (he might not have seen that a leader stepped over a trace) then the obstacle observer should tell him to stop and fix the problem. If the driver does not obey the command, this must be reported immediately to a member of the jury and marked on your report sheet.
  • Obstacle observers should report any outside assistance, which includes being followed or accompanied by any vehicle, bicycle, pedestrian or horseman and any advice from friends or spectators, solicited or not.
  • Outside assistance is allowed to right an overturned vehicle or help as a result of an accident, providing the grooms are dismounted. USE YOUR RADIO TO REPORT THE ACCIDENT IMMEDIATELY. Maintain control of the situation until the TD arrives and takes over.
  • Obstacle observers should report on the sheet any deliberate acts of cruelty such as excessive use of the whip or pressing of exhausted horses taking place at their obstacle. Report this IMMEDIATELY to a member of the ground jury.
  • After leaving the final obstacle, competitors may only stop to make repairs just outside the obstacle. Thereafter they may not stop without incurring penalties: they may walk or trot only to the finish. Record the time of any cantering or galloping, whatever the duration, between the exit flag of the final obstacle (or the last 300m) and the finish. Also record any stops, circles or deviations from the marked course. Intentional cantering in the last meters MUST be reported immediately to the jury and incurs elimination.
  • Advanced and Intermediate competitors may use any pace on the course and in the obstacles. Preliminary competitors may canter in the obstacles, but must walk or trot on the course. Training competitors may walk or trot in the obstacles and may walk or trot on course. Each break of pace for Preliminary and Training competitors is penalized 1 penalty point for each COMMENCED 5 seconds. Therefore, you must be aware of the duration of the break and record how many seconds the break lasts and where it occurred.
  • At the Intermediate, Preliminary and Training levels, the competitor must carry a whip in hand. Failure to do so should be reported to the ground jury.
  • As part of your equipment, you will find a page of “red dots.” Put one on any score sheet where any driving penalties have been recorded, other than for time, or on any sheet that you want the judge and/or scorer to look at carefully. Be alert and listen carefully at the briefing; you may be instructed to “hold” any sheet with a “red dot” at your obstacle and call for a jury member to look at it BEFORE it goes to the score runner, and subsequently to the scorer.

EXPLANATION OF DRIVING ERRORS:

  • Groom down: If a groom leaves the carriage (both feet on the ground), intentionally or not, penalties are assessed each time. Usually once a groom is down, he will stay down until the driver finishes the obstacle when he will jump on once the driver leaves the obstacle zone. If he gets back on and has to get off again, record this each time.
  • Driver dismounted: If this happens, be alert for a problem, but do not offer assistance or let anyone other than the grooms offer assistance unless the driver or his grooms ask, unless it is clearly a serious accident. Even then, the driver may have things under control without assistance. If they are in trouble, assistance should be promptly given and will not cause elimination.
  • Dislodgeable elements: These “knockdowns” are specially designed elements of the obstacle that can easily be disturbed or “knocked down.” If a dislodgeable element is dislodged, check this on the score sheet.
  • Holding a dislodgeable element: If the driver or groom makes an attempt to prevent the dislodgeable element from falling, record this in the appropriate space on the score sheet.
  • Turning over: While this is often a serious problem, wait for the driver to ask for assistance. Very often the carriage can be righted and the driver can continue in the obstacle. If 5 minutes have elapsed, the driver should be notified by 2 blasts with the whistle that he should leave the obstacle as quickly as possible.

TIMING PROCEDURE:

  • One timer should be at the entrance to the obstacle, the other at the exit. One timer should be designated as the official timer, and the second should keep time as well, but only to be used if the official timepiece fails. The second timer signals to the official timer by dropping his arm if he is in a different location from the official timer.
  • Start your stopwatch as soon as the nose of the leading horse crosses the plane of the “IN” gate.
  • Stop your stopwatch as soon as the nose of the leading horse crosses the plane of the “OUT” gate.
  • Record time on each competitor’s score sheet and on your running back-up sheet.
  • Each competitor’s time should be recorded in minutes, seconds and hundredths of seconds exactly as it appears on the stopwatch or the electronic timing device. DO NOT ROUND any numbers. Thus, if your stopwatch reads 01:57:07 (1 minute, 57 seconds and 07 hundredths), record exactly that, without rounding.
  • Write clearly, as your numbers become points! The scorer or a judge will actually assign the points – all you must do is write down the time in the obstacle.
  • Clear your watch and be ready for the next competitor.
  • If a competitor leaves the obstacle without going through the “out” gate, keep the watch running for five minutes total time in case he comes back to correctly exit. Once the competitor passes through the next compulsory turning flag on course (the next pair of red and white markers on course with numbers on it) he may not return to the obstacle. If the competitor does return, you may need to hold him if another competitor has come in the meantime, and use a back-up watch for keeping times for both. (See below.)

OTHER SITUATIONS THAT MAY OCCUR:

  • Hold-ups or delays: If another competitor arrives at your obstacle while a competitor is in the obstacle, the second competitor must not enter the obstacle until it is clear. Tell the overtaking competitor to wait. The overtaking competitor is to be held at a point on the course approximately 50 meters from the entry flags. He or his groom may time the delay, but you are to time his delay as well. Once the obstacle is clear and you have scored the previous competitor, restart the next competitor from his place approximately 50 meters from the entry flags. In the box indicated on the score sheet, write down the duration of the delay. You should tell the competitor the length of the hold and you should restart him by counting him down from 10 seconds.
  • Imperative! All hold-ups must be in whole minutes!
  • Two competitors arrive at your obstacle at the same time: Allow the faster of the two to go first. The second may circle or stand and wait approximately 50 meters from the entry flags until the obstacle is clear to be restarted. Again, this must be done in whole minutes! Record the delay on your score sheet. You should tell the competitor the length of the hold and you should count him down from 10 seconds.

Marathon Timers


Your duty is to record the Starting/ Finishing Time (whichever is appropriate) of each Competitor in the Timer’s Back-Up Sheet, and on the Competitor’s Marathon Time Cards (“Green Cards.”)

TIMER BACK-UP SHEET

  • Please write, in BLOCK CAPITALS, on each page, the sheet number; the Start or Finish of the Section where you are located and your Name. Also write your Name on the back of each page used.
  • Do not enter a Competitor’s number until he or she has arrived – Competitors may not come in the order that is listed on the Marathon Order of Go. Numbers will be on the vehicle and sometimes the groom will wear a pinney with the number on it.
  • Record on the Timer Back-Up Sheet the time of Starting or Finishing – all SIX (hours, minutes, seconds) figures from the digital clock. After you have recorded the time on the Timer Back-Up Sheet, record the same time on the Green Card.
  • Note any breaks of Pace (Only in the Walk Section, and for the Training and Preliminary Level, in Section B, which is TROT only), recording the actual length of time of each break of pace, whatever the duration. After the last Obstacle in Section B, or over the last 300 meters, whichever is the shorter, competitors may walk or trot only, and may not deviate from the course track. Please note on your back-up sheet any break of pace, halt, or deviation from the course track. If this occurs, you should contact TD, Head Timer, or Head Judge immediately and advise him/her what has occurred.
    If, at any time, you have any questions or are in doubt about anything, do not hesitate to make a note and report the matter to the Head Timekeeper, Judge or Technical Delegate, by radio, cell phone, or when any one of those officials comes around to you.
    Please note that all penalties will be calculated by the Scorers.

TIMING

All timing is taken from the nose of the leading horse.

A staff member will instruct you in the use of digital clocks and/or stop watches.

MARATHON TIME (GREEN) CARDS
These cards, which are usually GREEN, (thus the name “GREEN CARDS) are carried by all competitors and must be completed in the appropriate place by timekeepers, then initialed and handed back to competitors. Please take note that the Start Time Block is BELOW the Finish Time Block. This is done for mathematical purposes, making subtraction easier. PLEASE BE SURE TO FILL IN THE CORRECT BLOCK. Please be careful to be absolutely accurate with recording MINUTES. This is where most inadvertent errors are made in timing.

STARTS

  • The Order of Go for Competition B will show the scheduled Start Times.
  • ALL STARTS ARE FROM THE HALT. Ideally the horse’s nose should be on the start line, but common sense must be used and it is often better to let them start a little behind the line to avoid fidgeting. If a horse does not want to stand, it is okay to move around while waiting. The horse must still come to a halt, even a brief one, as or after the starter says “go” and before the horse’s nose passes over the start line.
  • Collect the Green Card and enter the time you will start the competitor. Confirm the time to the competitor or his groom. The timekeeper must advise the competitor that he has one minute before starting, then 30 seconds, then 15 seconds, and count down from 10 seconds before saying, “go.”
  • If a competitor is not ready to start Section A at his scheduled time, the timekeeper MUST record the time that the competitor ACTUALLY presents himself as ready to start. The timekeeper should call the Technical Delegate and advise the competitor that he is late for his start time, and that he must wait and speak to the Technical Delegate, and that he is unable to start him. The next competitor should be started at his own appointed time. The Technical Delegate will arrive and will give the timekeeper the new start time for the late competitor. The competitor will be penalized 0.2 of a penalty per second of the time elapsed between his scheduled start time and the time he was ready to start. The Competitor WILL NOT BE penalized if the Start of A is delayed for organizational reasons.
  • In the Transfer/Walk Section there MUST be a minimum of 2 minutes between the start of one competitor and the start of the next competitor, and competitors MUST only be started on whole minutes.
  • At the rest areas after the Transfer/Walk Section, a competitor must have the full rest period (minimum 10 minutes). He should then be started as soon as practical at the next available whole minute. Any dispute should immediately be referred to the Judge at the rest area. Starts should be spaced by at least four minutes. Sometimes the schedule demands longer periods between competitors, especially when classes change, so that they don’t run up on each other. The TD should advise the starter of those periods, and these starting gaps should be observed.

FINISHES
As the nose of the leading horse/s crosses the finish line, press the button on the digital clock to “freeze” the time in the window. Record the time on the Timers Back-Up Sheet using all six figures.
Collect the competitor’s Marathon Time Cards and record the time of finishing in the appropriate place (confirming the time with the competitor or his groom), initialing the card before returning it to the Competitor. At the finish of Section B, a member of the jury will be available to collect the cards from the competitors. The jury member will have the competitor or groom sign his Green Card.

CONTROL SHEETS
The Timer Back-Up Sheets are not collected during the competition, HOWEVER, you must turn them in at the end of the marathon, along with whatever other equipment you were issued. All scoring is done by using the Green Card collected at the End of Section B. If you have any problems, radio to contact the Technical Delegate or the Scorer. PLEASE RECORD THE TIME ON YOUR BACK-UP SHEET BEFORE YOU RECORD THE TIME ON THE GREEN CARD.

CONCLUSION
Timekeepers are requested to remain within easy reach of the public address system until officially released by the president of the jury or his representative, usually approx 1⁄2 hour after the finish of the marathon and the posting of scores.

SPECIAL NOTES
Grooms are required to be on the vehicle whenever they pass through a compulsory turning flag and may only dismount within 30 meters of the last obstacle or the last 300 meters to the finish. Grooms may dismount to repair harness anywhere on course, other than in the obstacles, provided the vehicle remains stationary.

Trail-Maintenance-Volunteers

Contact Chelle Grald – Michelle@gmhainc.org – (802) 457-1509, ext. 219 with questions or to sign up now!

Competitive Trail & Endurance

Pulse & Respiration Taker: Use a stethoscope and clock to take pulse and respiration readings on competition horses during holds and at the finish. Record that information and provide records to Pulse & Respiration Chair. This is not a difficult task and is a good learning opportunity. We will train you.

Pulse Timer: For Endurance rides only. Record pulse time for all competitors at holds and finish.

Pulse Recorder: Work with the pulse & respiration taker to record the information during the hold and finish of the competition. A good job for someone new to the sport who wants to learn how to take pulse/respiration.

Scribe: Assist the judges by recording results on score sheets throughout the competition. This is a tremendous learning opportunity but also a full day time commitment. Time: must be present for vetting in, typically the day before the competition; and then present for the entire competition until judging is completed.

Timer: Time and record start, mid-point or holds, and finish. Record in and out times, calculate elapsed times.

Timer’s Assistant: Help the timer with recording and handing out time slips at the start, mid-point and finish of the competition.

Awards: Assist the ride manager in organizing and handing out the awards at the end of the competition.
Scoring: Calculate competition results. Compile those results into a spreadsheet for awards. Math and computer aptitude are needed. The scoring math is not difficult.

Horse Ambulance Driver: Drive a provided truck/trailer to offsite holds and provide transportation back to grounds if necessary.

Ring Steward: Keep competitors organized during vetting in and/or vetting out process. Work with timer to establish order of finish and ensure that vetting out takes place in that order.

ECTRA Representative: Must be a member of ECTRA. Present during an ECTRA-sanctioned competition to answer questions about ECTRA and receive feedback from competitors. Must not be a member of ride management.
Runner: Bring score sheets from the judging area to the scoring area.

Hospitality: Assist the ride manager with ride breakfasts, on-trail snacks, or post-ride gatherings. Prepare and hand out food, clean up afterwards. You will be everyone’s favorite volunteer!

Crossing Attendant: Help riders to sight traffic and cross safely on pavement crossings during pleasure and competitive trail rides. You will not be stopping traffic. This is a great task for a tag-along spouse or friend to a rider.

Shopper: Make a trip to the grocery store to procure items for breakfast and trail snacks. Unload and put away those items in the Youth Center. Use your own vehicle or our truck. A list and credit card will be provided. Must be done 1 or 2 days before the ride starts.

Big Board (Distance Days Only): Record daily results for all of the Distance Days events on a large scoreboard with an eraseable marker. Must have good handwriting and be available once a day mid-afternoon from September 2-4. Need: 1 per day.

Pleasure Rides

Horse Holder: Hold horses for pleasure riders during their on-trail lunches. A fun chance to enjoy a beautiful spot, say ‘hello’ to some nice horses and make a rider’s day.

Hospitality: Assist the ride manager with ride breakfasts, on-trail snacks, or post-ride gatherings. Prepare and hand out food, clean up afterwards. You will be everyone’s favorite volunteer!

Crossing Attendant: Help riders to sight traffic and cross safely on pavement crossings during pleasure and competitive trail rides. You will not be stopping traffic. This is a great task for a tag-along spouse or friend to a rider.

Shopper: Make a trip to the grocery store to procure items for breakfast and trail snacks. Unload and put away those items in the Youth Center. Use your own vehicle or our truck. A list and credit card will be provided. Must be done 1 or 2 days before the ride starts.

Trail Network & Maintenance

Learn about work days, marking trail for events, becoming a Trail Steward and other fun ways you can help us to keep the trails in top shape here:

Trail Maintenance Signup